All posts in Business

In 2001, GE was just a classic conglomerate: financial services, media, industrial . I always had an idea to maybe make the company more focused on those things that I thought we were best at, and that's a high-tech, manufacturing-based, global product and service enterprise. And that's what we are today.

Jeff Immelt (American Business Executive)

No, it's high margin. It's an interesting business. It's filled with great people. But I could see technology changing. I didn't think, in the end, that we were willing to do all the things that I viewed as being required to be successful.

Jeff Immelt (American Business Executive)

I’ve done this for 14 years. For anyone who thinks it’s easy, these are hard jobs. But you also have this sense that no matter what happens we can get better.

Jeff Immelt (American Business Executive)

I had this feeling we were still constructed for an American-centric economy and I realized we had to get more global.

Jeff Immelt (American Business Executive)

We don’t want to be Microsoft or Google, but we’re inspired to be better because of them.

Jeff Immelt (American Business Executive)

For me personally, I am most proud of helping increase our capacity for that type of impact.

Jeff Raikes

At the foundation, we have to think in the same way. We have what to some might seem like large financial resources, but relative to the scale of the problems that we’re taking on, they’re a small percentage of what is needed. So we have to think in a very catalytic, very leveraged way—engaging partners and getting aligned along outcomes. We call this catalytic philanthropy.

Jeff Raikes

A good example was my decision a few years ago to personally engage with the critics of our U.S. education work. I wanted to show the rest of our leadership how important it is for us to be intellectually curious, not only among those with whom we work closely but also with those who may criticize our work. 

Jeff Raikes

In business, competition is a very good thing. It really raises the level of your game. Similarly, in philanthropy, you have to listen to the critics. They may have insights about your work that would cause you to shift your strategy or that will determine how you need to respond to such criticism through your messaging.

Jeff Raikes

Boy, we’re really digging deep here. Well in the 1970s, it was a period of a lot of campus activism. And my freshman year there was a lot of intensity around the issue of Stanford investments in companies that were perceived as supporting Apartheid in South Africa. And there were something north of 250 students that were involved in a sit-in in Old Union, and I was part of that. Got arrested. So, there you have it. One of the great ironies now is that as a trustee, I’m on the special committee for investment responsibility. These things kind of come around.

Jeff Raikes

There’s another segment of philanthropy that I would call organization building, or something along those lines, where the operating model is more venture philanthropy, where the philanthropist will see that there’s a social entrepreneur and his or her organization has a theory of systemic change that they want to invest in. Maybe it’s Sal Khan and Khan Academy, and so on and so forth. And so the philanthropist in effect has a portfolio of bets, much like a venture capitalist.

Jeff Raikes

It was good for me to have a plan, but it was important to be open to opportunity.

Jeff Raikes

Because I had always worked on the farm, I had never done any job interviews. So when Apple Computer came on to campus, I said, 'Well, I'll get some experience doing a job interview.' Six months later, I was the head of VisiCalc.

Jeff Raikes

Do what you love to do, and something that's valuable for the company.

Jeff Raikes

Steve Jobs called up and yelled at me, telling me Microsoft was going to go out of business

Jeff Raikes

Page 2 of 39012345...102030...Last »
error: Content is protected !!
UA-55292910-2